Spring 2010 course list

The deadline to add a class for the Spring 2010 semester is looming (it’s this Friday, January 29)! If you’re still looking for that last awesome class to take, here is a list of the linguistics courses (and courses of interest to linguists) being offered this semester. This list is also posted on the Program and Courses page.

Course # Title Call Points Instructor Day/Time
LINGUISTICS W4190 Discourse Analysis 96196 3 Timberlake MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
LINGUISTICS G4206 Advanced Grammar and Grammars 99697 3 Timberlake T 6pm – 9pm
Anthropology V3947 (note: this class is now full) TEXT, MAGIC, PERFORMANCE 22846 4 Pemberton W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Anthropology V3947 Linguistic Anthropology of Artificial Languages 05169 3 Kockelman M 11:00am-12:50pm
Psychology BC 3164 Perception and Language 06596 4 Remez T 6:10pm-8:00pm
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New course for Spring 2010

Hello all,

Hope your quickly-waning break has been wonderful and relaxing! Professor Paul Kockelman will be offering a new course next semester:

The Linguistic Anthropology of Artificial Languages: Meaning and Information, Interpretation and Computation, Language and Media

Anthropology 4325
Monday, 11:00-12:50
Altschul Hall 303

Here’s a short abstract for the course:

This course is about artificial languages through the frame of linguistics and anthropology, with a focus on the digital and computational mediation of meaning. In some sense, it is about human-based significance in relation to machine-based sieving—with a focus on computer languages, architectures, algorithms, and interfaces. It is intended for both graduate students and advanced undergraduate students.

For more information, you can download the syllabus here.

New course for Spring 2010: Perception and Language

Psychology BC 3164: Perception and Language
Tuesday, 6:10 – 8 pm

Next semester, Professor Robert Remez will be offering a seminar in psychology, focusing on issues of language and how we perceive and process it.

In an ordinary day, we have many, many poignant, pointless, important, ridiculous, and thrilling conversations. Why do we do it?

Who knows? People have been concocting bad answers to this awful question for several thousand years, and we still haven’t decided on a formulation we like. But, if we ask a more recent and useful question – How do we actually do it? – then we find that we have a lot to learn, because the answer depends more on discovering things than on dreaming about human nature.

Topics will include:

  • The way the senses work
  • The sounds of speech
  • The conversion of meaning into sound and back again
  • How we integrate the perceptual and linguistic pieces of an utterance

For more information and a full description of the course, download the announcement here.

UZBK W1101: Elementary Uzbek 1

Хайрли окшом!

Here’s another cool course that is being offered next semester (Spring 2010):

UZBK W1101: Elementary Uzbek 1
Call number: 76149
Tuesday and Thursday 6:10-8pm
4 points

If you have any questions, please contact Grace at hgz2103@columbia.edu

Spring 2010 – Courses

Registration for next semester is coming up fast. Here is a sampling of some of the linguistics and anthropology courses being offered in Spring 2010:

Spring 2010 LINGUISTICS W4190
DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
Section 001 Call Number: 96196 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: Alan Timberlake
Spring 2010 LINGUISTICS G4206
ADV GRAMMAR AND GRAMMARS
Section 001 Call Number: 99697 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 11:00am-12:50pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: Alan Timberlake
Spring 2010 Anthropology V3947
TEXT, MAGIC, PERFORMANCE
Section 001 Call Number: 22846 Points: 4
Day/Time: W 2:10pm-4:00pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: John Pemberton
Spring 2010 Anthropology G4325
LING ANTH OF ARTIFICAIL LANG
Section 001 LINGUISTIC ANTHRO ARTIF LANG
Call Number: 05169 Points: 3
Day/Time: M 11:00am-12:50pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: Paul Kockelman

Welcome back!

Hello everyone. I hope that y’all* had wonderful summers, and are now back and ready for more linguistic adventures.

A few things, quickly:

  • Registration is this week, and there are some cool linguistics courses being offered this semester:
    Fall 2009 LINGUISTICS W3101
    INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS
    Section 001 Call Number: 95797 Points: 3
    Day/Time: TR 6:10pm-7:25pm Location: 702 Hamilton Hall
    Instructor: Alan Timberlake
    Fall 2009 LINGUISTICS W3997
    SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH
    Section 001 Call Number: 63651 Points: 2-4
    Instructor: Alan Timberlake
    Fall 2009 LINGUISTICS W4800
    LANGUAGE & SOCIETY
    Section 001 Call Number: 22847 Points: 3
    Day/Time: MW 4:10pm-5:25pm Location: 703 Hamilton Hall
    Instructor: John H McWhorter
    Fall 2009 LINGUISTICS W4903
    SYNTAX
    Section 001 Call Number: 50283 Points: 3
    Day/Time: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm Location: 707 Hamilton Hall
    Instructor: Alan Timberlake

    For more information look up Linguistics by subject in the Course Directory.

  • There will be a Cottage dinner in the near future…  date and time TBA.
  • Finally, a linguistics joke! A little macaronic silliness to spice up your weekend:
Q: According to Sigmund Freud, what comes between fear and sex?
A: Fünf.

That’s it for now. More announcements and tasty links to come.

* Because English needs a good second-person plural pronoun.

New course!

In the Fall 2009 semester, the Computer Science department will be offering a new course on speech processing.

CS 6998: Topics in Speech Processing: Computational Approaches to Emotional Speech

This course introduces students to research on emotional speech. We will explore state-of-the-art work on recognizing and producing classic emotions automatically. Emotions such as anger, happiness, sadness, and uncertainty are important to recognize in online dialogue systems and to produce in computer games. We will also study the recognition of other types of speaker state, including deceptive and charismatic speech, and the uses of acoustic and prosodic information in medical domains, for the diagnosis of mental and physical disabilities. Classes will be lecture and discussion with an emphasis on group participation. There are no prerequisites for the course.